Contact Glendoick

Contact Garden Centre

Open 7 days

9am to 5.30pm (summer)

9am to 5pm (winter) (Sunday 10am to 5pm)

Phone: 01738 860260
Email gardencentre@glendoick.com

Link to bus timetable X7, Perth, Glendoick, Dundee


Contact Cafe and Foodhall

Cafe closes 45 minutes before Garden Centre

Phone: 01738 860265
Email restaurant@glendoick.com


 

Glendoick Garden Centre is proud to be a member of the GCA - Britain's Best Garden Centres

To see our plant guarantee click here...


 

Contact Form

 

Your Contact Details

 
 
 

Garden Centre Opening Times

Summer

Monday to Sunday: 9am - 5.30pm

Winter

Monday to Saturday: 9am - 5pm
Sunday: 10am - 5pm

 

Cafe closes 45 minutes before Garden Centre closing time.

Garden Opening Times 2018

1st April - 31st May
Open 7 days 10am - 4pm.

Tickets must be purchased from the garden centre till before driving up to the gardens.

Glendoick Garden Centre, Glencarse, Perth, PH2 7NS


×

Share this with your friends

Get our monthly emails & blog post checks

Glendoick Advice Sheets 2 plants for purposes

 

 

 

Taken from Garden Plants for Scotland by Kenneth Cox & Raoul Curtis Machin.

Plants for different purposes & problem sites.

 

Glendoick Recomended Plants for dry shade

Low light levels and summer dryness make dry shade one of the tougher problem areas for gardeners. It suits only a fairly select number of plants, and getting plants established under trees can be difficult, especially trees such as beech and sycamore, which are both greedy and cast a very dense shade. Physically digging between roots can be hard work, and it’s often worth creating planting pockets with good compost to replace impoverished soil. Leylandii hedges are also bad news, as they take so much moisture from the soil for up to 2m either side, or more. The north side of a leylandii hedge is a particularly poor place to garden. Most plants with coloured and variegated foliage tend towards green in deep shade. In general, planting is best done in autumn, once first rains have come. Everything should be regularly watered until roots are well established.

 

Shrubs

Aucuba japonica
Cornus canadensis
Euonymus fortunei
Hedera hibernica
Hypericum ‘Hidcote’
Ilex aquifolium
Lonicera pileata and L. nitida
Mahonia
Pachysandra terminalis
Prunus lusitanica and P. laurocerasus
Rhododendron decorum and R. yunnanense
Ribes
Rosa x alba ‘Alba Maxima’
Rubus
Ruscus aculeatus
Sarcococca humilis
Skimmia japonica
Symphoricarpos
Vinca

 

 

Perennials and bulbs

Anemone x hybrida/japonica
Astrantia
Brunnera macrophylla
Convallaria majalis
Epimedium
Digitalis (foxglove)
Dryopteris filix-mas (fern)
Geranium macrorrhizum, G. phaeum and others
Helleborus argutifolius, H. foetidus
Lamium
Luzula (grass)
Maclaeya
Pulmonaria
Tiarella cordifolia
Viola odorata
Bulbs 
Eranthus (aconite)
Cyclamen 
Galanthus (snowdrop)
Hyacinthoides (bluebell)

 

 Glendoick Plants for moist shade

Provided the soil is not waterlogged, nor the shade too dense, moist shade can support a wide range of plants. Shade under the edges of the crowns of trees and large shrubs is deal, whereas right underneath the middle of a dense tree such as beech will be too dark and too dry for almost all plants. The north sides of walls often provide sites with moist shade.

Shrubs

Aucuba
Bamboos
Berberis
Buxus sempervirens
Callicarpa
Desfontainea
Gaultheria
Hydrangea
Ilex
Mahonia
Osmanthus
Prunus laurocerasus and P. lusitanica
Rhododendron and Azalea (dappled or part day shade only as deep shade causes shy flowering and straggly plants.  Yellow varieties of larger hybrids need very sharp drainage

 

 

Perennials and bulbs

Alchemilla mollis
Arum italicum
Astrantia
Bergenia
Brunnera
Dicentra
Digitalis
Dodecatheon
Ferns
Gunnera
Heuchera
Hosta
Luzula sylvatica 

 

Tiarella
Tricyrtis
Camassia 
Cardiocrinum 
Galanthus
Eranthis, 
Narcissus (species)
Trillium  

 

Glendoick Plants for clay soils

Many Scottish gardeners have to contend with clay soils, especially those in flat valleys such as the Carse of Gowrie between Perth and Dundee. Clay soils are heavy, often tending to set and crack when too dry. Regular waterlogging, compaction and lack of air around the roots can kill many plants, and the easiest way to deal with clay is to garden on it, rather than in it. Many plants can be far more successfully grown in raised beds, a minimum of 30cm high, with lighter, free-draining topsoil or compost, held in by wood, rocks, cobbles and other materials. Or use containers.
Trees and shrubs (including climbers)
Aucuba japonica
Aesculus hippocastanum (chestnut)
Berberis darwinii, B. stenophylla
Chamaecyparis lawsoniana cvs
Cornus alba
Cotoneaster
Cryptomeria
Hamamelis
Humulus lupulus aureus
Metasequoia glyptostroboides
Philadelphus
Populus
Pyracantha
Quercus robur
Ribes sanguineum
Roses (but dislike being waterlogged)
Salix, including S. hastata, S. caprea, S. matsudana, S. chyrsocoma
Sambucus racemosa
Syringa vulgaris
Taxodium distichum
Viburnum opulus, V. bodnantense
Weigela florida

 

Perennials and bulbs

Ajuga reptans
Aster novae-angliae, A. novi-belgii
Astilbe & Aruncus
Astrantia
Carex elata 
Digitalis
Ferns, including Osmunda regalis, Polystichum setiferum
Filipendula ulmaria
Gunnera manicata
Helenium
Hemerocallis
Hosta
Houttuynia cordata ‘Chamaeleon’
Inula hookeri
Iris laevigata (Flag Iris)
Lythrum salicaris
Mimulus
Monarda
Persicaria affine
Primula florindae, P. japonica
Rodgersia
Rudbeckia
Solidago
Trollius

 

 

Glendoick Plants for windy sites inland

Plants may need extra help to establish in very exposed sites: use artificial materials such as fencing or woven plastic. Trees should be securely staked when newly planted. 

Trees and conifers

Acer platanoides, 
A. pseudoplatanus cultivars
Alnus glutinosa, A. incana 
Betula
Chamaecyparis lawsonia
Crataegus monogyna
Fagus sylvatica
Juniperus horizontalis, J. squamata
Larix decidua
Pinus sylvestris
Querus robur
Sorbus aucuparia, S. aria
Tilia cordata
Shrubs
Azaleas (deciduous) 
Aucuba
Bamboos
Berberis (deciduous) 
Buddleja davidii
Cornus alba
Cornus canadensis
Corylus
Cotoneaster
Cytisus (except C. battandieri)
Deutzia
Forsythia
Hippophae rhamnoides
Ilex aquifolium
Kerria japonica
Pinus mugo ‘Mops’
Potentilla fruticosa
Prunus laurocerasus
Pyracantha coccinea
Rhododendron ‘Cunningham’s White’, ‘Fastuosum Flore Pleno’ etc
Rosa pimpinellifolia, R. rugosa
Salix alba (and others)
Sambucus niger
Spiraea
Symphoricarpos
Ulex
Viburnum opulus
Weigela
Perennials and bulbs
Achemilla mollis
Anaphalis
Aster alpinus
Bergenia
Brunnera
Euphorbia
Polemonium
Veronica spicata

 

 

Glendoick Autumn Colour foliage 

Autumn colour: the most reliable plants for Scotland 
Best autumn colour is achieved in dry crisp autumns. Mild wet ones are less impressive. Most of the plants listed below will colour well every year.

 

Acer, including A. palmatum ‘Ösakazuki’ (probably the best of all)
Berberis thunbergii
Betula
Cotinus ‘Grace’
Enkianthus
Euonymus alatus, E. europaeus ‘Red Cascade’
Fothergilla
Larix
Parthenocissus
Rhododendron (Azalea) luteum and other deciduous azaleas
Rhus typhina
Amongst others, Amelanchier, Liquidambar, Liriodendron, Parrotia, and Quercus rubra can be good or disappointing, depending on the year.

 

Glendoick Listing: the best berrying trees, shrubs & Perennials for Scotland

Berries and hips are both ornamental and in most cases beneficial to birds and animals in winter. The best berry set is usually after hot summers such as that of 2006. Some berries are eaten by birds as soon as they are ripe, while others, less tasty to wildlife, hang on well into winter.
Trees and Shrubs
Cotoneaster horizontalis, C. hybrida pendula, etc.
Decaisnea fargesii
Euonymus hamiltonianus and europaeus
Gaultheria (Pernettya) mucronata (male needed)
Ilex (female forms only (male needed near by)
Mahonia aquifolium
Malus (crab apple) (most need pollinators)
Pyracantha
Rosa species but not hybrids
Sorbus aucuparia and Chinese species S. hupehensis, S. cashmeriana, etc.
Skimmia reevesiana and S. japonica (male needed)
Viburnum opulus, V. davidii (needs male)
Perennials
Actaea
Arum

 

 

Scented plants for Scotland (Glendoick)

Many plants have scented flowers. Many of the best are winter flowering and some remarkably small flowers can produce very strong fragrances. Scent is often best at dusk and on warm and still days. 

Azarra
Buddleja
Choisya 
Corylopsis 
Cytisus battandieri
Daphne
Dianthus (pinks)
Fothergilla
Hamamelis mollis (witchhazel)
Lilium (lilies)
Lonicera periclymenum (honeysuckle)
Osmanthus
Philadelphus 
Phlox maculata
Primula veris (cowslip)
Rhododendron ‘Loderi’, R. decorum, Tinkerbird, R. edgeworthii
Azaleas: R. luteum, R. arborescens
Rosa (many) (rose)
Sarcococca (winter box)
Syringa (lilac)
Viburnum (winter flowering)
Viola
Wallflowers

 

 Plants to attract butterflies, moths, bees  

Aster novi-belgii
Buddleja
Astrantia
Ceanothus
Clethra alnifolia
Digitalis (foxglove)
Echinacea
Echinops
Eryngium 
Escallonia
Eupatorium
Helleborus (flowers before most plants, providing vital food)
Hydrangea
Lavandula (lavender)
Linaria
Mentha (mint)
Nepeta (catmint)
Perovskia
Salvia (sage)
Scabious and Knautia
Sedum spectabile
Solidago
Spiraea
Thymus (thyme)
Verbascum
Verbena bonariensis

 

Climbers for north-facing walls in Scotland

North-facing walls usually get little or no sun, so few climbers will flower well until they reach the top of the wall. It is therefore better to concentrate on growing foliage plants. This list contains the best performers. 

Cotoneaster horizontalis (will climb against a wall)
Pyracantha   self supporting, flowers and berries.
Hedera  (Ivy)
Parthenocissus  (Boston Ivy and Virginia Creeper)
Hydrangea petiolaris  (climbing Hydrangea)
Lonicera japonica Halliana (foliage plant)